My Day with the Serial Entrepreneur

Geoff Pickle, Web EditorAbove tennis shoes, jeans and a patterned button-up  shirt – something I might wear on the weekend – sits a mind ripe with ideas. Add working largely out of my favorite place in Springfield, and I’d call my day shadowing downtown businessman Paul Sundy a memorable one.

I enjoyed catching a glimpse of the inner workings of the beautiful Gillioz Theatre – with its classic gold ceilings, stained-glass window and ornate flower carpet patterns – which beat the odds to come out from under bankruptcy and appears to be going strong under Sundy’s English Management leadership.

“The heartbeat is alive,” Sundy said of the venue his company began managing in September. “Every good downtown has something like the Gillioz.”

At the “Gilly,” Sundy was bordered by posters of shows, including the December showing of comedian Mike Birbiglia, which had me guffawing. Sundy and crew discussed potential upcoming shows such as Relient K, an American rock act the theater later booked for a July concert. Though they haven’t landed them, the crew also had on the preliminary idea board a favorite rap group of mine, Odd Future. I’m still hopeful on that one. (If they’re reading this, my wallet is at the ready.)

Sundy, left, talks with Gillioz operations managers Kyle Adams and Vance Hall.

Sundy, left, talks with Gillioz operations managers Kyle Adams and Vance Hall.

In his morning meeting, Sundy smoothly converses with two theater operations managers – Vance Hall and Kyle Adams – who serve as both English Management and Gillioz employees, and though young, seem as intent on making the theater a success as the 34-year-old Sundy. A blackboard dominates one wall of the small management room, remains of chalk evidence of the ever-changing numbers, figures and schedules. “This industry is so relevant immediately. You gotta be ready to pull the trigger,” Sundy says.

His gig at the Gillioz fits with the fast-paced world of restaurant ownership. Sundy deals by keeping his phone handy at all times. He uses an online service called ShiftNote, which allows him to keep in touch through his phone in real time with the various managers of his restaurants, as well as view changing financials and needs. He called it an open-book management style of sorts.

Though he has south-side establishments, Sundy appears to have made a home for himself downtown. His office sits on McDaniel Street near the intersection of Jefferson Avenue, a comfortable walking distance to the Gillioz, Big Whiskey’s, Dublin’s Pass and Parlor 88.

Sundy makes the short walk from his McDaniel Street office to his establishments on Park Central East.

Sundy makes the short walk from his McDaniel Street office to his establishments on Park Central East.

It allows interesting meeting places with business associates. Sundy’s afternoon meeting at Dublin’s Pass was particularly noteworthy.

Sundy shares a beer with Woodruff developers Tim Roth and Matt Miller, who show him the blueprints of their redevelopment idea for the iconic building that touches the Gillioz.

It’s clear the developers valued Sundy’s ideas on the building, which ranged from restaurant connectivity to the pool to an exclusive rooftop bar, something Sundy seemed to think was a moneymaker. “It will be a hot ticket. From an entrepreneur’s standpoint, you want the world to want to try it,” he said. “I think you want to market it as ‘the first.'”

The meeting was strictly preliminary and amounted largely to a brainstorming session, but Sundy did express his interest. We’ll wait and see on that one.

Sundy speaks with Sky Eleven developers Matt Miller and Tim Roth. SBJ photos by WES HAMILTON

Sundy speaks with Sky Eleven developers Matt Miller and Tim Roth.
SBJ photos by Wes Hamilton

From my takeaway on May 1, it seems Sundy’s days come and go in a blaze, with success as the end goal. As a resident, worker and fan of downtown, I look forward to what he’ll do next.

Related:

Day in the Life with Paul Sundy

Photo Gallery

Advertisements

0 Responses to “My Day with the Serial Entrepreneur”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




RSS Latest Headlines from SBJ.net

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

SBJ Tweets

Archived Blog Posts

All content © 2008 SBJ Publishing Inc.

*The newsroom blog of Springfield Business Journal
Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: